English 3, CP (2015-6)



Essential Question:
What is the American Idea?

2nd Semester:
5/3
Whitman/Dickinson

5/2
Finish NoodleTools
Whitman/Dickinson

4/29
Debrief from Yale. Read poems.

4/28
Yale Art Gallery with poem.
Schedule and assignment:

9:45: Arrive at Yale and enter museum.
10:00: Students divided into three groups for one-hour tour of American art with the theme of the American Idea.
11:00-12:00: Lunch on your own. Please do not venture too far away from the museum. Check maps for local restaurants. Enjoy.
12:00: Meet back in main lobby of museum. At this point you will report to your assigned artwork. You are to write a poem about your chosen selection.
The poem will be read with a friend either videotaping you and the artwork or just the artwork with your voiceover. Use no flash photography. Give yourself enough
time to compose, revise, and read your poem.
In your journals please use the following model, as written yesterday in class:

Title of artwork

1) "As I look today..."
2) a color
3)
4) a shape

5) a verb
6) a verb
7)
8)

9) "inside"
10)
11)
12) "outside"

13)
14) "shadow"
15)
16) "light"

17) "road"
18)
19) "home"
20)

21) "And then..."
22)
23)
24)

Include these lines or variations of these lines:
Walt Whitman line:"Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars."
Emily Dickinson line:
"And sings the tune without the words"
1:00: Meet out front and board bus back to Morgan.

4/27
American Painting.

4/26
American Painting

4/25
Painting and art week unit.

4/18-22
Vacation

Gatsby projects:
summary, themes, object, poem, song,
3 lines and significance

4/11
chapter 7 due.

4/8
chapters 5, 6
continue junior portfolio

4/7
junior portfolio

4/6
chapters 1, 2, 3 due

4/5
introduce The Great Gatsby

3/22
Mrs. Robinson review NoodleTools. Rubric provided.

3/21
Continue drafting paper and making edits.

3/18
Finish drafting first five pages of research.

3/17
research writing.

3/16
evaluating sources quiz

3/15
introductory paragraph

3/9-3/11
Turning cards to draft.
Introductory paragraph.

3/7, 8
Finish cards, begin outline, consider draft

3/3
Independent reading
Silent reading

3/2
SAT.

3/1
Practice SAT.

2/29
SAT practice:
College Board - FREE Online Study Guide (PDFs)
__https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/inside-the-test/study-guide-students__
======College Board - Daily Practice App (Allows you to scan & grade practice tests)
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/daily-practice-app

==

College Board - Full Length Practice Tests
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/practice/full-length-practice-tests
Khan Academy - Tips & Planning (Videos)
https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/new-sat/new-sat-tips-planning
Khan Academy - New SAT Website
https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/new-sat

2/25
SAT practice

2/24
Noodle Tools cards/20 due Friday.

2/23
CRAPS

2/22
Continue research (computer down); Boomtown, "Crash"

2/19
Cannery Row collect.
Return to research next week.

2/18
Finish Cannery Row. Grateful Dead: Loser, Wharf Rat

2/17
In-class essay about Cannery Row: community, loyalty, success, friendship

2/9, 2/10


2/3
SAT practice/College Board and Kahn Acedemy

2/2
Continue Cannery Row.

2/1
Discuss Cannery Row.

1/29
Reading day.

1/28
Cannery Row discussion.

1/27
Listen to chapters 2 and 3.
Continue watching Steinbeck video.

1/26
SAT Prep.
Discuss chapter 1.
Introduce reading schedule:
date: chapters:
1/28 1-8
2/1 9-14
2/3 15-20
2/8 20-end

1/25
Return mid-term exams.
Collect final draft of compare/contrast.
Introduce Steinbeck's Cannery Row.

End First Semester
Exam Review:
Readings:
“To Build a Fire” by Jack London
“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce
“The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe
“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin
“The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving
“Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving
“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson
“A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor
“Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain
“Disgraced” by Ayad Akhtar
“A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry
“Clybourne Park” by Bruce Norris

Process analysis

Bring hard copies of the following to class on exam day:
Compare/contrast
C/C
  • Explain two or more key points
  • Show s/d between these points
  • Develop thesis that takes a stand
  • MLA, 12 font, TNR, ds, no first person
  • Paragraphs
  • Why is this such an import topic
  • text from play, quotes
  • will use writing school-wide rubric

Short story:
  • Setting
  • Characters
  • Plot
  • Theme
  • Conflict
  • Resolution
  • Mood
  • Follows story expectation
  • Hero's Journey
  • consistent tense

Play:
*appropriate grammar
  • Play format
  • hero’s journey; story expectations
  • know what is happening
  • creative
  • no clichés
  • no over explanation
  • address important themes
  • starts well
  • 8-page




1/13
sentence structures:
1) The Gabby
Independent clause [ ; ] independent clause [ . ]
Example: Doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma; they are unsure of its cause.

2) The Nhu
Independent clause [ ; ] independent marker [ , ] independent clause [ . ]

Examples of independent markers are the following: therefore, moreover, thus, consequently, however, also.

Example: Doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma; therefore, they have called for more research into its causes.

3) The Shyster-
Dependent marker dependent clause[ , ] Independent clause[ . ]

Examples of dependent markers are as follows: because, before, since, while, although, if, until, when, after, as, as if.

Example: Because doctors are concerned about the rising death rate from asthma, they have called

Long Wharf Invitation:
Good Morning Eric!

I hope this message finds you well. As you can probably tell from all of the emails, we are very busy over here at LWT!

I’m spending some time this morning to make a special reach out to the amazing teachers who have brought students to our theatre this year to see if you would like to bring your students to HAVING OUR SAY. This show is not to be missed by theatre goers and history buffs alike!

“Centenarian sisters Sadie and Bessie Delany tell us about their eventful lives, how they fought injustices big and small, overcoming the racial strife of the 20th century with their charm, warmth, and dignity intact. They share a personal family tale of people who yearned to do the right thing, and strove towards it with every ounce of their beings. Come have dinner with the Delanys, and hear the story of our nation.”Curriculum Connections include women's history, black history, personal narrative, oral traditions, adaptation, theatre studies, and so much more. STUDENT MATINEES will be held on March 15-18 at 11AM. Student tickets are $17 each, and student group rates can be arranged for ANY performance date that you are interested in. Link to Request Tickets

We would love to welcome you and your students back into our theatre, and would be so glad to answer any questions that you may have!

Madelyn Ardito | Education Programs Manager
Long Wharf Theatre | www.longwharf.org
Phone 203.772.8272| Fax 203.776.2287


1/12
Review for final exam.

1/11
Research. Noodletools, Five cards due Wednesday by midnight.

1/8, 7
Continue updating play, short story, compare/contrast

1/6
Reading.

1/5
Visit HCH Library.

1/4
Format story to play:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vtPWEk7AECw

12/22
Listening and Viewing assignment:
Boomtown, Insured by Smith and Wesson.
prompt: How does this episode explore out notions of truth and validity?


3 act story revision.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aL5nXl2z-u0

12/21
E-Begin 3 act story structure.
B-Choice book.

12/18
B period type and share research proposal.
E, G add text to compare/contrast essays.

How to Quote and Cite a Play in an Essay Using MLA Format

The Modern Language Association (MLA) has very specific guidelines for quoting and citing information from a play within the text of an essay. While the citation is the same no matter who or what you are quoting, the method of quoting the play depends on several factors. This information should help you quote and cite plays correctly in MLA format.
Instructions
  1. Step 1
Remember that any exact wording from the play must be properly formatted as a quote (as we will describe) and cited. Failing to adequately quote and cite material is a form of plagiarism and can have dire consequences.
  1. Step 2
Use a lead-in for all quotations. A lead-in is a short explanation of the quote and who is saying it. For example: When she saw the car crash, Jane turned to Steve and said, "Look what happened." Do not use floating quotations--do not just stick quotes into a paragraph with no setup or lead-in.
  1. Step 3
Cite all quotations from a play using the author's last name and the act number, scene number and line numbers. If your copy of the play is not numbered, you'll have to count the speeches to get this number. Some plays do not have scene numbers; if so, simply omit it. Place everything in parentheses at the end of the sentence that contains the quotation. Follow this construction if you want to cite a quote from Arthur Miller's "The Crucible" that comes from Act 2 and lines 15-17 (this play does not have scenes): (Miller 2.15-17).
  1. Step 4
Quote a monologue (one character's speech) or one side of a piece of dialogue by simply including a lead-in, enclosing the exact wording in quotation marks and adding a citation. Add a comma before the quotation. Example: To impress the successful Bernard, Willy exaggerates his son Biff's success, "Well, he's been doing very big things in the West. But he decided to establish himself here" (Miller 2.281-282).
  1. Step 5
Quote a long monologue (four or more lines) delivered by a character by setting it off in block format. This means that, instead of enclosing it in quotation marks, you put the quotation on a separate line from the lead-in and indent it 10 spaces. For block quotes, end the lead-in with a colon. Don't forget to cite it. Example:
Willy continues his delusional discussion with the nonexistent Ben:
Without a penny to his name, three great universities are begging for him, and from there the sky's the limit, because it's not what you do, Ben. It's who you know and the smile on your face! It's contacts, Ben, contacts! The whole wealth of Alaska passes over the lunch table at the Commodore Hotel, and that's the wonder, the wonder of this country, that a man can end with diamonds here on the basis of being liked! (Miller 2.202)
  1. Step 6
Quote sets of dialogue between two or more characters by also using block format and putting the characters' names in all capital letters. Don't forget a lead-in and a citation that includes all speeches being quoted. Example:
Willy's delusions consistently show how much Happy and Bernard idolized Biff, especially when they argue over who will carry his football gear:
BERNARD. Biff, I'm carrying your helmet, ain't I?HAPPY. No, I'm carrying the helmet. BERNARD. Oh, Biff, you promised me. HAPPY. I'm carrying the helmet. (Miller 2.213-216)



12/17
E and G to computer lab for: research question refined, Noodle Tools notecards, research proposal draft.

12/16
Research proposal format.


12/14
Begin compare/contrast.
Continue research with proposal:

English 3, CP

Research 2015-6

Mr. Bergman

Writing the Research Proposal



You will be required to write a short proposal for your argumentative research paper.
(Final draft—six to eight pages--is due in April and presented the following month)
This proposal will be an expansion of your thesis statement to tell a bit more about your paper topic and present a few of the sources from which you plan to gather your researched material. This short proposal must include the following information:

  1. Your purpose for writing this paper. What will you examine and why is that important?

  1. Your role as the writer of this paper. What techniques will you use to both inform your reader and present your argument in a persuasive manner?

  1. Your working thesis statement or hypothesis. What do you expect to find in your research?

Here is an example of a short research proposal:

Some university instructors complain that incoming freshmen are inadequately prepared for the demands of college-level research tasks. This is probably due to a failure of communication between high school and college instructors and administrators. This research project will examine the existing literature concerning the research habits of high school and college students and will also present original data collected from the examination of hour first-year college English courses and four senior-year high school English courses. This research and its conclusions will seek to adequately prepare their students for the rigors of college courses. By isolating the skills in which students most need improvement, this project will assist high-school instructors and administrators to plan and teach more effective English courses.


As you can see, this is a one-paragraph proposal. And yet, it conveys, directly or indirectly, all of the required information listed above. The purpose is to help those instructors and administrators to improve their students’ skills in research. The researcher’s role in the project is both to inform the audience, and to advocate a particular course of action (by drawing forceful conclusions concerning what methods seem to work best at the high school level). And the working thesis is contained in the opening lines: that the inadequate preparation of incoming college freshman is due to high-school teachers’ poor understanding of college-level work.

Ongoing Projects:
Two papers: PA, CC
Play
Research
Two plays: RS, CP
SAT Prep

12/9
Finish Clybourne Park.

12/8
Collect PA
Continue reading play.

12/7
Clybourne Park reading.
Collect PA essay and letters on Tuesday.

12/5
Begin new play.

12/2
Continue with process analysis
Begin author letters.

12/1
Process analysis

11/30

Process Analysis 1st draft due 11/30 at midnight.
Letter first draft due 12/1 at midnight.
Letters about Literature
Process Analysis assignment
Introduction.

11/24
Finish A Raisin in the Sun.
Happy a great Thanksgiving!!!

11/23
Continue with play. Finish Act II.
Trivia quiz.

11/20
Finish Act II.
Trivia quiz.

11/19
Choice book.

11/18
Raisin.

11/17
Long Wharf guest speaker.

11/16
Continue A Raisin in the Sun.

11/13
Computer lab. Noodle Tools. 3 citations.

11/12
Select quote from play and state importance.
KWL graphic organizer for research.
Friday in computer lab.

11/11
Veteran's Day dedication

11/10
Continue reading play. See on-line text.
Teacher resource.
Listen to "Harlem"

11/9
Political Compass as it pertains to reading of play

11/5
G=Choice book.
E, A=SAT prep: major tests, college board
junior portfolio

11/4
Continue play.
Student generated questions.
Bill O'Reilly/Cornel West: personal responsibility vs, systemic

11/3
Continue play

11/2
A Raisin in the Sun
Langston Hughes "Harlem"

10/30
Discuss play.

10/29
Disgraced

10/28
Finish play.
Watch Long Wharf preview.

10/27
Return projects.
Continue reading Disgraced in preparation for Thursday.
Collect student revised stories.

10/26
Sub: choice book.

10/22
Choice reading.

10/21
Project edits and revisions.
Collect research ideas and questions.

10/20
Computer lab for part 2 of student research interests.
Project revised for Friday. Short story revised for Wednesday.
Homework: complete research worksheet for Mrs. Robinson.

10/19
1st draft of student short story projects returned (cover page, table of contents, paragraphing, fonts, 400 words)
Short story given back. Revisions due Tuesday for period B and E.
Update Goodreads.

10/16
Present projects.

10/15
Last minute project work.

10/14
Continue with short story projects.
Discuss PSAT with class.

10/13
Introduction to authentic research.
Consider research ideas.

10/9
Short Story quiz.

10/8
Continue with project.
Prepare for identification short story quiz.

10/7
What is American Lit?
Name influential Americans in various categories.

10/6
Show trailers.
Due dates:
Short story annotation check 10/7
Short story quiz 10/9
Short story project 10/13
Short story revised.

10/2
Continue working on trailer.
Discuss "Hills like White Elephants"
Mark Twain story due Monday (see below).

9/29
Work on story trailer due 10/5.

9/28
Work on story trailer.
"A Good Man is Hard to Find" due Tuesday.

9/24
Collect on 10/6 all stories annotated. Short story quiz.
Story trailer introduced, 9/29 due. Instructions distributed.
Field trip form distributed.
"The Lottery" distributed.

9/23
Free reading, discuss Irving story

9/22
Continue annotating Washington Irving stories. See link below.
Due Wednesday.
Bring free reading book for Wednesday.

9/21
Ask about field trip interest.
Discuss The Legend of Sleepy Hollow.
Please read and annotate both Irving stories for Wednesday.

9/18
Introduce story trailer project.
Hand out and begin listening to "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow"
E period please annotate first 6 pages for Monday.
Check print out--or folder on phone--for course Wiki.

9/17
starter: how do we encourage young people to read?
Introduce GoodRead and create account.
Remind students about book chat.
Listen to "The Story of an Hour" summary.
Attach annotation rubric to story and submit.
Next assignment: Sleepy Hollow--9/21

9/16
"The Cask of Amontillado"
annotating

9/15
Review Poe.

9/14
Reading due.
Ambrose Bierce.
Watch 1962 film short of Bierce story.
Poe story with annotations due tomorrow, 9/15. See below for link.

9/11
London literary criticism.
Annotating: PE (plot events), UW (unfamiliar words), CON (conflicts), PC (personality of character), SYM (symbolism)
Distribute Ambrose Bierce story “An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge” by Ambrose Bierce due 9/14

9/10
Continue discussion of "To Build a Fire"
Discuss in relation to American Idea (character flaw)

9/9
Remind students of summer reading requirements.
Look at annotation sheet. Begin close reading of London.
Jack London bio.
Jack London story due with annotation.
Bring choice book to class. Summer writing 9/18.

9/8
Hand out syllabus with reading schedule.
Hand out Jack London's "To Build a Fire"
Annotate a text.
Assignments:
Unit One:
The American Short Story:

Readings, Due:
“To Build a Fire” by Jack London 9/10
“An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge" by Ambrose Bierce 9/14
“The Cask of Amontillado” by Edgar Allan Poe 9/15
“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin 9/17
“The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving 9/21
“Rip Van Winkle” by Washington Irving 9/23
“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson 9/25
“A Good Man is Hard to Find” by Flannery O’Connor 9/29
“Hills Like White Elephants” by Ernest Hemingway 10/1
“The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County” by Mark Twain 10/5

Assignments:
Book Trailer 9/29

Short Story 10/20
True Tales of American Life with interview 10/27


9/4
Collect art painting stories. Read to each other.
Define American Idea.
Watch Slomo.
Watch Bono piece.

9/3
Look at Hopper painting. What is the image saying to you?
Review student stories.
Listen to Mark Reep story "House by the Sea"
How do we use image and word to convey story?

9/2
Discuss two paintings.
Homework: Write a 1-2 page typed story using one of the paintings as prompt.

9/1
Introductions





















































4/27
Collect final drafts.
Begin Trigger Warning NEWSELA
In College/Trigger Warning
In College Classrooms

Pro/Con Civics Class NEWSELA

Pro-Con - World Cup Soccer NEWSELA

4/24


4/20
Continue story edits

4/16
Hemingway "A Very Short Story"

4/15
"Indian Summer"

4/12-13
Writing revision

4/2
flash fiction


4/1
Symbolism
House by the Sea


March:
3/30
Read and edit flash fiction stories

3/20
Select title, character, setting

3/24
Tobias Wolff "Say Yes"

3/23
Junot Diaz "How to Date a Brown Girl (Black Girl, White Girl, or Halfie)"
New York Times article
"Is College Hiding Us From Scary Ideas?"

3/20
Sherman Alexie "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven"

3/19
Russell Banks "Black Man and White Woman in a Dark Green Rowboat"

3/18
Hemingway "Hills like White Elephants"

Hemingway:
"A Cat in the Rain"
analysis
film

"A Clean-well Lighted Place"
"Hills like White Elephants"

Junior Portfolio preparation
SBAC practice

February:
Clybourne Park and A Raisin in the Sun projects and edits.

1/5-7
"A Raisin in the Sun"

12/22
Paul Auster "Augie Wren's Christmas Story"

12/19
SAT reading comp. practice/chapter 6.

12/18
SAT practice week 6
Portfolio due Friday.

12/16
John Updike's "A & P"

12/15
Finish reading "Teenage Wasteland" by Anne Tyler.
"Old Mate"

12/8
13 ways of introduction.
E: correct soccer
G: correct Kingsolver

12/5
"Fire and Ice"
blending quotes

12/2
Blending quotes.
Boomtown, "The Squeeze" with quotes

12/1
evidence of text.

11/25
CNN News
President Obama response.

11/24
Wyclef Jean "Immigrant"
"Interstate"

11/21
Obama speech (Immigration).
Poem "Stupid America"

11/19
SAT book page 23, 6-10.
Watch tutorial.

11/18
SAT critical reading page 54.
Type Kingsolver essay.

11/17
Sub
Choice book

11/14
D:
SAT Foundations #7: Reading Passage Strategies

11/13
G: Take page 54 SAT practice critical reading.
Watch "Delivery" as American values
E: Type Kingsolver essay in computer lab.

11/12
Typed Kingsolver essay.

11/11
Read FDR Third Inaugural Address from 1941

11/10
D: weekend paragraph
SAT practice on-line

11/7
Read poems.
Elections by states as pertains to American Idea.

11/6
G: PTA poems, typed for Friday
E: American myth
D: Listen to C-Span radio for American views
Read myth packet


11/5
E: poetry PTA
G: American myth

11/4
American myth

11/3
Common writing mistakes

10/30
parenting styles
20 common writing mistakes

10/29
SAT essay edits.

10/28
SSR

10/27
Teacher at workshop
Students complete SAT essay on page 20.

10/24
Dan Pink Motivation

10/23
Continue with letter

10/22
Letter advice

10/21
Collect and work on letter project.
Majortests.com practice

10/20
Sir Ken Robinson, American Idea

10/17
SSR

10/16
Begin drafting letter with ideas.
Take political compass test.
Notes:
Core American Values

In 1970 Robin Williams identified core American Values. They were:

  • Equal Opportunity
  • Achievement and Success
  • Material Comfort
  • Activity and Work
  • Practicality and Efficiency
  • Progress
  • Science
  • Democracy and Enterprise
  • Freedom


10/14
"Homeward Bound" Tom Hazuka
"The Dead" Beverly Jackson
Give out letter assignment.

10/10
Trivia

10/9
E:
Painting
Poem

10/8
Painting evaluation video
Painting, by Leutze "Washington Crossing the Delaware"
music, Fleet Foxes, Blue Ridge Mountains
Sivilization by Azar Nafisi (annotation)

10/7
starter: SAT New York Times
Assessment 1: SAT book, orange, chapter 2 reading

10/6
painting by James Rosenquist "President Elect"
(line, color, tone, texture, space, shape)
music by Eddie Vedder "No Ceiling"
poetry by William Stafford "At the Un-National Monument Along the Canadian Border"
Reading "Throw Out the College Application System" by Adam Grant

10/3
S. Breyer "Constitutional Restraints"

10/2
Read and annotate "Frontiers"
Discuss in timed group chats.
Relate idea to class essential question?
What is the American Idea?

9/30
starter: creative confidence
poem

9/29
starter: paraphrase as reading comprehension tool. (Madison quotes).
annotating tutorial.
Begin to annotate Adams' 1797 Inaugural Speech

9/26
News ELA article (world Cup Soccer)
Student paragraph in computer lab. (pretest)

9/25
SSR
Half-day

9/24
GoodReads account and book selection.
10 friends, 10 books to read, 1 recommendation.

9/23
Declaration of Independence.

9/22
MLK/Malcolm X (violence in social change?)
Text reading

9/19
Summer book chats.
starter: What is a revolutionary and do these people exist today? Where?
Thomas Paine brief introduction.
Richard Wolfe on Thomas Paine.
Read parts of Paine's The Crisis.
Discuss and write about three powerful words from text.

9/18
starter: summer reading chat
Human nature: Matt
Human nature debate

9/17
starter: what is 18th century literature and why is it important?
Discuss Deism: 5 common beliefs:
  • 1. Faith in natural goodness - a human is born without taint or sin; the concept of tabula rasa or blank slate.
  • 2. Perfectibility of a human being - it is possible to improve situations of birth, economy, society, and religion.
  • 3. The sovereignty of reason - echoes of Rene Descartes' cogito ergo sum or I think, therefore, I am (as the first certitude in resolving universal doubt.)
  • 4. Universal benevolence - the attitude of helping everyone.
  • 5. Outdated social institutions cause unsociable behavior - religious, social, economic, and political institutions, which have not modernized, force individuals into unacceptable behavior.
9/16
Franklin: 13 precepts.
Human perfectibility.
Deism: blank slate

9/15
Continue with Ben Franklin's Autobiography and Deism.
Student conduct experiment in which they behaviors they believe to be detrimental.

9/12
Starter: Is human nature good, bad, or blank slate?
Autobiography of Ben Franklin and discuss precepts.

9/11
Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan Edwards
Read sections. Write a quick note with similar tone.

9/10

Seth Godin and schooling.

9/9

starter: Moyers and American religion
To My Dear and Loving Husband

9/8

Listen and read Mayflower Compact: discuss religion and body politic
Read and respond to Anne Bradstreet's "Before the Birth of One of Her Children"

9/5
Syllabus given
"God-drunk Society" Sam Harris
Calvinism:
I

9/4

Sir Ken Robinson
Spin

9/3

"Bartholomew's Song" (2005)

9/2

class introductions


English 3, CP 2013-14

Introduce weekly blog assignment:
Reflect upon a film, a discussion, a reading, an activity from the week--either in class or out.
Enter a 10-sentence commentary on your personal blog. In addition, cut and paste a commentary from another student and respond to their comments in a 5-sentence reflection. Each are due on Thursday night by midnight. Some computers at Morgan may not allow you to do this unless you use either Google Chrome or Firefox.

Format:
Date, Week #, Title of blog

Blog dates and subjects:
Week One: January 24, any subject
Week Two: January 31, American Reader
Week Three: February 7, any English related subject.
Week Four: February 14, any English subject
Week Five: February 21, any English subject
Week Six: February 28, any English subject, please include the words story, character, plot in response
Week Seven: March 7, how does the American Idea show itself in literature?
Week Eight: March 14, read attached article and respond. Use text from article. SAT
Week Nine: March 21, read attached article and respond about grades.
Week Ten: March 28, read this link and answer the question? Why do we study literature?
Week 11: April 4, Write about what you are looking forward to over the next few months.
Week 12: April 11, What are your initial thoughts about A Raisin in the Sun?
Week 13: April 18: What are you reading over the break? Tell us about it.
Week 14: April 25: Who was your favorite character from A Raisin in the Sun? Why?
Week 15: May 2: What are your initial thoughts about Clybourne Park?
Week 16: May 9:
no. I’m sorry, but can we just come out and say what it is we’reactually-? Shouldn’t we maybe do that?because if that’s what this isreally about, then...jesus, maybe we oughta save ourselves some timeand and and and just...say what it is we’re really saying instead of doingthis elaborate little dance around it...okay.okay. If you really want to – It’s...(tries to laugh, then, sotto)...it’srace. Isn’t it?you’re trying to tell me that that...(tolena) that implicit in what yousaid – That this entire conversation...isn’t at least partly informed – am Iright? (laughs nervously, tolena) by the issue of ... (sotto) of racism.Act II,Clybourne ParkSteve’s statements launch the characters into a fueled exchange about whetheror not racism is playing a part in the difficulty they are having in addressingthe changes about to take place on the property. They challenge each other’snotions of what is considered offensive. They accuse each other of beingracists. They become offended when they feel that their particular group hasbeen belittled. Acknowledging the elephant in the room opens a Pandora’s boxfor this group.
Why is it sometimes difficult to remain calm when a taboo subjecthas been brought into a conversation?Why is it sometimes difficult to speak about issues of race, class,and socio-economic status?What other issues do you find it difficult to talk about?Is there someone in your life that you can address difficult issueswith? If not, who do imagine yourself going to?How have historic events over the last fifty years shaped how weview race and class in this country today? From your point of view,have these areas been improved upon or worsened? Explain.
Answer one of the questions above.

Week 17: May 16 (no blog)
Week 18: May 23: Identify a poem that you enjoy from this website. What makes this poem so powerful>
http://www.poetryfoundation.org/browse/
Please list the title and author while providing link to poem.
Week 19: May 30: Write a 20-line poem about any of the Walker Evans photographs. Identify the title of the photograph. You do not need to respond this week to other blogs.
Week 20: June 6


2nd Semester
6/3
Summer reading returned.
Rebel Diaz poem.
Ras Baraka poem.
No blog this week.

5/30
Reading
Wendell Berry

5/29
Boomtown

5/28
Poetry

5/27
Poem on this photograph
Mark Doty on Joan Mitchell.
Summer reading.

5/23
poetry

5/22
poetry

5/21
poetry

5/19
Poem about sculpture.
Listen to "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot

5/15
Poetry

5/14
Poetry

5/13
Poetry

5/12
Poetry


5/8
Donald Sterling/Race
Close Reading of New York Times article

5/7
Clybourne Park
Bruce Norris interview

5/6
Clybourne Park

5/5
Clybourne Park

5/2
Gentrification
Community

5/1
D: Finish Clybourne Park
C, G: Finish Act I of play

4/29
Continue with Clybourne Park reading.

4/28
Clybourne Park.


4/24: Begin Clybourne Park

4/23
A Raisin in the Sun, questions 7, 8 from end of play.

4/22
Finish A Raisin in the Sun.

4/21
Continue play.

4/9
Continue play.

4/8
D, G--Write poem after listening to TED talk.

4/7
Continue play.

4/4
Begin A Raisin in the Sun

4/3
half day

4/2
SBAC tests

3/31
Prepare for essential question quiz:
What is the American Idea?
1) Atlantic Monthly, 2) fiction, 3) non-fiction

3/27
SBAC testing

3/26
SBAC testing

3/25
SBAC testing

3/24
Boomtown, Insured by Smith and Wesson: narrative structure

3/21
Grading blog discussion.
Review of Junior Portfolio.
Will continue with Tonto paper next week.
SBAC

3/20
Prepare for Junior Portfolio.

3/19
Native-American sports mascots.
Continue with Alexie reading. Discuss.
Collect one-page paper.

3/18
G, C: Write a one-page paper (12 font, TNR, double space) that selects one line from the Sherman Alexie
story "The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven" and answers: Why is this line so important to the
understanding of the story?

3/17
Smarter Balance practice test

3/14
Junior Portfolio video

3/13
Finish reading "The Masque of the Red Death"
The Pathology of the Rich

3/12
Commercial Cadillac
Begin "The Masque of the Red Death"

3/11
Deschooling.

3/10

3/7
Read and discuss Welty's "The Whistle"

3/6
Substitute

C:
English 3, CP
Finish Welty's "A Worn Path" on 456. Answer questions 7 and 8 on page 462 on a separate
sheet of paper, not journal. Number 7 should be at least half page and number 8 should be
full page. Remaining time is reserved for silent free reading. Remind students of blog assignment.

D:
English 3, CP
Silent free reading. Please note students who participate. Do not allow homework
from other classes. Remind of blog assignment.



3/5
Continue with Welty "A Worn Path"
and analysis.
Blog due Thursday evening.

3/4
"A Worn Path" by Eudora Welty
Analysis

3/3
What should fiction try to do?
Listen to brief interview with Stephen King about short stories.

2/28
C: trivia

2/27
C: Denis Johnson's "Emergency"

2/26
Read and discuss Paul Beckman's "Tall Chairs" from contextual perspective.

2/25
Listen to Poe's "The Tell-Tale Heart"

2/24
Listen to Band cover of "Atlantic City" as starter. Does this narrative create a story?
Listen to Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"

2/14
D: SSR
G: POL

2/13
Snow Day
Blog week 4 due.

2/12
G: Discuss "Teenage Wasteland"
C: Boomtown written response in computer lab
D: The Fence.

2/11
C: Boomtown, Crash, for Listening and Viewing rubric
D: John Taylor Gatto

2/10
Teacher absent.
Read Anne Tyler's "Teenage Wasteland" and answer questions at end of story.

2/7

1/30
Junior portfolio video and student check sheet.
Reading and blog work.

1/29
More Seeger works. Protest music.

1/28
Pete Seeger "If I Had a Hammer" and page 585 from American Reader.
Junior Portfolio.
Collect poems.

1/27
American Reader starter question
Junior Portfolio work
Collect poetry for lit contest
Collect chapter 7 for SAT vocabulary story.
JUNIOR PORTFOLIO RESOURCES

1/24
Continue with junior portfolio items: reading (American Idea exam readings), creative expression(SAT week 7 story), technology (American Idea Prezi). Check blog entries.

1/23



1/22
Computer lab for SAT vocabulary work.

1/21
MLK Riverside speech

1/16
Return exams and review.
Class evaluation.

1/10-15
Exams

1/9/14
Final review for mid-term.
Notes on American Culture and youtube video.
http://clio.missouristate.edu/chuchiak/american_cultural_traits.htm
Seth Godin Ted Talk
1/8/14
Teacher illness. Free read text.

1/6/14
G period. Select one short lecture and watch. Return to school with overview.
Khan Academy
Exam review: 60 SAT review words, American Idea reading, sentence structures, Huck Finn, Free Reading

1/2/14
Review Huck Finn
Watch Ted lecture about self-branding

12/20
C: Boys of Baraka
D: trivia, initial game

12/19
C, G: quiz and finish chapter presentations

12/18
Blog due Thursday night.
Continue chapter presentations.
Novel completion due Thursday.

12/16-19
Huck Finn
Race: Cornel West

12/13
starter: Read end of chapter 19 and discuss significance of Huck's development.
Continue with chapters 17-29.

12/12
starter: video of Black Barbershop
Continue with text discussion and analysis.

12/11
C, D: chapters 1-17 line quiz.
D: group project: skit, 3 lines, summary, song

12/10
Snow day

12/9
G: Boomtown, Reeling in the Years, one-page journal.

12/6
starter: Colbert report
Read blog entries and discuss in pairs for 90 seconds
Blog response due by midnight.
See reading schedule.

12/5
starter: Tim Wise
Reading chapters and discuss race.
Blog due tonight by midnight.

12/4
Starter: Watch CBS 60 Minutes short video. Respond.
Read chapter 5 together and select line that relates to theme.
12/3
Reading schedule:
12/9: page 109
12/13: page 205
12/19: end of book
Themes:
1) the education of Huck
2) race/slavery
3) hypocrite in the "civilized"
4) superstition

While reading each chapter, please identify the page, line, and theme that you select.
Also, make one commentary by Thursday night and one response to a commentary by Friday night.
This is for the three weeks of reading.
Use edublogs.

12/2
Begin Huck Finn

11/26
Watch JKF Civil Rights speech from June 2013
No vocabulary due this week.

11/25
Watch JFK Inaugural Address.
Discuss speech.

11/21
Collect Rondeau poems for PTA contest.
C: Read Bev Jackson's "The Dead" narrative structure
D: Boomtown, "Reelin' in the Years"
10 why questions
No SAT story this week.


11/20
C, D: Write a Rondeau for Thursday, typed, 12 font, Time New Roman, punctuation
11/19
11/18
G: write cinquain for PTA contest.
C: discuss starter and volleyball celebration.

11/15
G: see 11/13
collect week 6 SAT story with 1-6 sentence identifications.

C, D: collect week 6.
SSR

11/14
Starter: What was most difficult about your American Idea revisions?
Peer edit and submit.
6th week SAT story due Friday.

11/13
America as 11 Nations map.
Listen to Woodard interview.
Edit American Idea paper and resubmit for Thursday.

11/12/13
C=Vet's Day chat
Hand back SAT vocab. story
Dialogue rules.
D: Sentence structures 1-6
G: Sentence structures 1-6

11/11/13
Veteran's Day video and discussion.

11/8
G=Cover 8 dialogue format steps and apply to week 5 SAT story.

11/7
G=SSR
C=starter: listen to Robert Lowell poem and respond, "The Public Garden"
Hand back poems,select two poems from poets.org, print, and revise your two poems with these two formats.
D=Collect poem, SSR
Homework: week five SAT story

11/6
C=starter:

We can’t rely on others to be our teachers anymore…the future belongs to individuals who decide to become great bosses (and teachers).” – Seth Godin, Are you willing to be your own teacher?


Sentence structures 1-6
Read and collect poems.
D=same starter as C
Write 12-line poems. Type for Thursday.
G=no class

11/5
Read Seth Godin quotes
Watch TED talk for Seth Godin (D period)
D period write two poems

11/4
Starter: StoryCorps values: compassion, responsibility to others as American value
SAT chapter 8, 1-10 as practice

10/31
G:Finish De Crevecoeur, Listen to 4 storycorps tales, sketch

10/30
G=Read "Letters from an American Farmer" by De Crevecoeur
Look at American Paradox
Collect last of American Idea

10/29
C=Boomtown, The Squeeze
questions/comments
D=post Boomtown writing and discussing

10/28
starter: review first quarter
C=Read "Letters from an American Farmer" by De Crevecoeur
Follow by Russell Brand
D=Boomtown, The Squeeze, 8/8 question/comment
G=R. Brand

10/25
Collect 2nd draft of American Idea paper.
Collect week 3 of vocabulary stories.

10/24
(Half-day)
MLA edits to paper.

10/23
SSR

10/22
Read and discuss "The Dumbest Generation."
Collect American Idea paper.


10/21
C,D: American Idea paper work in computer lab


10/18
starter: Where are you will the college application process?
To computer lab for American Idea paper. Due Tuesday.
Collect vocabulary story part 2.

10/17
starter: Thoughts about yesterday's SAT practice session.
"The Curse of Fat Face" reading, writing, discussing
G: Begin to draft American Idea paper due Tuesday.
(MLA, 3-pages, textual evidence)
Vocabulary stories week 2 due Friday.

10/16
No classes meet today.

10/15
G, C: SAT vocabulary reading chapter 6.

10/11
Read chapter one of vocabulary paragraphs.

10/10
C, D: Remind students about vocabulary paragraph due Friday.
SSR or prepare paragraph.

10/9
starter: Watch National Parks short video and discuss how your notion of the American Idea compares to this.
D: Prezi, Vocab. story week one, Works Cited Page, revise body paragraph.
C: free write story idea for Friday.
G: starter: line from free reading book and importance.
"The Curse of Fat Face" with sketch and reading response.

10/8
C: See D from yesterday choose vocabulary setting, character, and quote.
D: Choose vocabulary setting, character, and quote.
G: " ."

10/7
starter: What do "The Pledge of Allegiance" and "The Star Spangled Banner" have in common.
D: Continue discussion.
G: Continue Prezi and print our three American Idea articles. Write one body paragraph.


10/4
C: Finish reading class declarations. Read Stenger's "Wilderness" from text. SSR with ten-minute book chat.
G: see C, D

10/3
C, D: Read "The Declaration of Independence" and discuss four parts. Create short declaration of independence from friend. Read in class.
G: see C, D from yesterday.

10/2
C, D: present SAT vocabulary assignment (see attached link). Paragraph due each Friday
beginning 10/11
Page 44 in orange SAT book.
Free read on deck.

10/1
C, D: Prezi about American Idea.

9/30
C, D: Write one body paragraph for American Idea.
G: Same, return to Prezi.

9/27
D period: American Idea. Bring three articles Monday
G: American Idea Prezi and research.

9/26
Begin American Idea research.

9/25
SSR

9/24
SSR

9/23
starter: What is the importance of having a well-read populace?
Select two books from school library. Reading session.

9/20
SAT work.

9/19
SAT work (reading and sentence correction)
Discuss summer reading program.

9/18
G: see C from yesterday
C: Look at American Idea from Atlantic Monthly

9/17
G: see C
C, D: Read Paul Krugman article "Rich Man's Recovery"
How does our sense of equality relate to the American Idea?


9/16
C: Watch Sir Ken Robinson video of public schooling and write starter.
divergent thinking, aesthetic experience
Sean Penn 9-11. Zinn.
D: Sir Ken Robinson
Remind of Book Chat on Friday.


9/13
C: American Exceptionalism paragraph, Read Putin's controversial op-ed piece.
D: American Exceptionalism paragraph, Watch Howard Zinn piece briefly
Watch Sean Penn's 9-11 film and compare to Zinn.
G: Sean Penn film and write about.

9/12
C: see yesterday
D: pictures, Bartholomew's Song and American Idea
G: Read Putin's op-ed piece. Discuss American exceptionalism.

9/11
D, G: Starter: What are the characteristics of an effective public speaker?
Introduce TS, CD, CM, CM, CM paragraph format.
Listen to a portion of Obama 9/10 Syria speech.
Read Malcolm X on page 176 to discover word choice and inflection.
Watch Bartholomew's Song and discuss meaning with hero's journey and American Idea.

9/10
G period: see 9/9
C period: Begin reading Common Sense (government vs. society)
Watch "Bartholomew's Song" as it pertains to the American Idea


9/9
C, D: Read Thomas Paine from "The Crisis"
Listen to GW Bush 2003 Iraqi speech
Look for words that evoke emotion.
Write an emotional in-class page and read.
G period: see 9/6

9/6
Starter: how do we help create people of good character?
Notes on Deism vs. Calvinism:
(Absent Landlord)
I. Common Beliefs
  • 1. Faith in natural goodness - a human is born without taint or sin; the concept of tabula rasa or blank slate.
  • 2. Perfectibility of a human being - it is possible to improve situations of birth, economy, society, and religion.
  • 3. The sovereignty of reason - echoes of Rene Descartes' cogito ergo sum or I think, therefore, I am (as the first certitude in resolving universal doubt.)
  • 4. Universal benevolence - the attitude of helping everyone.
  • 5. Outdated social institutions cause unsociable behavior - religious, social, economic, and political institutions, which have not modernized, force individuals into unacceptable behavior.
  • Read parts of Franklin's "Autobiography" and discuss 13 precepts.

9/5
Starter: Read Theodore White piece "The American Idea" on page 611 and respond.
Listen to Oliver Stone discuss American Exceptionalism.
SAT chapter one sentence correction.

9/4
Read William Bradford's "Landing" from Ravitch book.
Listen to Reagan speech invoking religious wording.
Discuss: Who can define America and how do they do it?

9/3
starter: What makes America exceptional?
Distribute Ravitch books.
Read "Mayflower Compact"
Puritan notes:
American Puritanism:
Two Important New England Settlements

The Plymouth Colony
Flagship Mayflower arrives - 1620
Leader - William Bradford
Settlers known as Pilgrims and Separatists
"The Mayflower Compact" provides for
social, religious, and economic freedom,
while still maintaining ties to Great Britain.

The Massachusetts Bay Colony
Flagship Arbella arrives - 1630
Leader - John Winthrop
Settlers are mostly Puritans or Congregational Puritans
"The Arbella Covenant" clearly establishes
a religious and theocratic settlement,
free of ties to Great Britain.

I. Basic Puritan Beliefs - Tulip

1. Total Depravity - through Adam and Eve's fall, every person is born sinful - concept of Original Sin.
2. Unconditional Election - God "saves" those he wishes - only a few are selected for salvation - concept of predestination.
3. Limited Atonement - Jesus died for the chosen only, not for everyone.
4. Irresistible Grace - God's grace is freely given, it cannot be earned or denied. Grace is defined as the saving and transfiguring power of God.
5. Perseverance of the "saints" - those elected by God have full power to interpret the will of God, and to live uprightly. If anyone rejects grace after feeling its power in his life, he will be going against the will of God - something impossible in Puritanism.

Manifest Destiny: The concept of manifest destiny is as old as the first New England settlements. Without using the words, John Winthrop articulated the concept in his famous sermon, the Arbella Covenant (1630), when he said: " ... for we must consider that we shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us; ..." Winthrop exhorts his listeners to carry on God's mission and to set a shining example for the rest of the world. From this beginning, the concept has had religious, social, economic, and political consequences. The words manifest destiny were first used by editor John L. O'Sullivan in 1845.

8/30
Continue to explore American Idea.
First Unit:
What is the American Idea? Who defines it?
Is the U.S. exceptional?

8/29
Periods C and D: Listen to the American Idea youtube video. Post pictures in and write about American Idea.
Hand out syllabus.
8/28
starter: MLK question, listen to "I Have a Dream" speech
What is the American Idea? Who defines it?

8/27
Introductions.
Journals given out.









































May 13
Free reading session. Good Reads update.

May 10
A=no class
E=SAT purple, chapters 1, 5 (1-10)

May 9
A=poetry rewrite
E=Introduction paragraph

May 8
A=SAT evaluation
E=Read student poems. Discuss sensory images.

May 7
A=Read student selected poems and collect
E=SAT evaluation

May 6
Type ekphrasis poems to be read on Tuesday.

May 3
Field trip to yale art gallery

April 22-May 2
Continue exploring American art and connection to American experience.

April 8-12
Prepare for American art exhibit at Yale

4/5
David Brooks The Practical School

4/4
Practice story
4/3
SAT practice

4/2
SAT practice

4/1
Kristen Adams visit, college article

3/26
Please type SAT prompt essay. Use school rubric (Writing) to evaluate your work. Use a half-page typed for each of the four top tier qualifiers (we recorded these in class today. Due Thursday (not Wednesday as first thought for A period). https://docs.google.com/a/clintonpublic.net/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Y2xpbnRvbnB1YmxpYy5uZXR8bW9yZ2FufGd4OjYxYWEzMzNhZmQ0OWYzMGU -- The Morgan School Clinton, CT

3/22
Free read session.

3/21
Imagery for short story. revision 7.

3/20
Listen to Raymond Carver's "Chef's House" for story ideas

3/13-15
Continue to edit story and add to. Poetry, anaphora

3/12
Add a first paragraph to your existing story using idea from either/or
both of these Hemingway stories.
Just print a fresh 4th copy and recycle the others.

E=due Wednesday
A=due Thursday

1st paragraph for "Hills like White Elephants"
The hills across the valley of the Ebro were long and white. On this side
there was no shade and
no trees and the station was between two lines of rails in the sun. Close
against the side of the
station there was the warm shadow of the building and a curtain, made of
strings of bamboo
beads, hung across the open door into the bar, to keep out flies. The
American and the girl with
him sat at a table in the shade, outside the building. It was very hot and
the express from
Barcelona would come in forty minutes. It stopped at this junction for two
minutes and went to
Madrid.

1st paragraph for "A Clean, Well-lighted Place"
It was very late and everyone had left the cafe except an old man who sat
in the shadow the leaves of the tree made against the electric light. In
the day time the street was dusty, but at night the dew settled the dust
and the old man liked to sit late because he was deaf and now at night it
was quiet and he felt the difference. The two waiters inside the cafe knew
that the old man was a little drunk, and while he was a good client they
knew that if he became too drunk he would leave without paying, so they
kept watch on him.




3/11
Collect 3rd story draft. Free read session.

3/6
A=Cheever story
E=Donald Barthelme "I Bought a Small Town"
Edit stories.

3/5
E=Continue with revision. Listen to John Cheever's "Reunion" as an example.
3/4
Revise short story, cutting out any material not pertinent to conflict and
development. Remember, put character in a tree, throw rocks at him or
her, and then get her out.

Bring in new draft for Tuesday (E period) or Wednesday (A period). Typed
reflections of:
Half-page: What did you cut and why?
Half-page: How do you put character in tree, throw rocks at him or her,
and then get her out?

Check:
consistent tense
use of symbols
imagery
polarities
dialog format.
3/1
Revise short story

2/26
Continue creating story which will be due Friday.

2/25
E period-Begin short story idea. Select picture, setting, name, conflict, point of view. Look at Hero's Chart.

2/15
Free Read. Check accounts and collect 10-sentence draft.
Read 200 pages of your Free Read book over break. Update your account
before we return on the 25th, stating the pages that you have read. I will
be reading five or more of your books over break; I look forward to
talking to you about your reading.

Feb 14
Please complete another ten-sentence response to one of the questions for
"Battle Royal." Times New Roman, 12 font. Include the question as well as
using textual evidence. Post to Wiki and bring hard copy to class.

Update Good Reads account with currently reading option. Bring book to
class. Extra credit fort HCH Library Teen Room.


Feb 13
Select one question from today's "Battle Royal" handout. Answer question
in a ten-sentence typed response. Use textual evidence. Post to your WIKI
and bring in hard copy for both Thursday and Friday.

Select a new Good Reads book. Update your account by midnight Wednesday.
Make sure that HCH, Morgan Learning Commons, or you have a copy of this
book which you will need to have with you for Friday (between 170 and 300
pages or see me).

Do not read any short stories beyond "Battle Royal." I'd like you to
finish your new Good Reads book for after vacation.

Reread "Battle Royal" in class.


February 6
Hemingway's "Hills like White Elephants"

2/5
"Listen to "The Black Cat"
Circle words that convey extra meaning.
Consider word meaning to each
individual.

February 4
Discuss Rip Van Winkle and The Masque of the Red Death.

February 1
Discuss Rip Van Winkle
Read The Masque of the Red Death for Monday.

January 29, 30
Read "Rip Van Winkle" for Friday with 3/3
Boomtown "Crash"
Distribute short story books and reading schedule:
Reading Schedule:
2/1 “Rip Van Winkle”/handout
2/4 “The Masque of the Red Death”/textbook
2/5 “The Black Cat”/handout
2/6 “Hills Like White Elephants”/green book
2/7 “A Good Man is Hard to Find”/green book
2/8 “Battle Royal”/green book

2nd Semester Overview:
Latin/Greek roots
Stanley Fish sentence structures
Rhetoric
Critical Thinking unit
Creative Writing
SAT
20th century literature
GoodReads
Interests
Atlantic Monthly American Idea
Extra Credit

Polarities:

Public/Private
Community/Individual
Civilization/Wild
Home/Road
City/Country
Mind/Body
Pragmatic/Philosophical
Stability/Movement
Obedience/Defiance
Machine/Nature
Science/Art
National/Local
East/West
Confinement/Freedom
Safety/Risk
Self-Preservation/Self-Anihilation
Realism/Romance
Inside/Outside
Hamilton/Jefferson
Youth/Old Age
War/Peace
Exam Review

Mid-term exam: (journals can be used)
  • SAT readings
  • Polarities (see board) as developed in American fiction
  • Three fundamental questions:
1) What does it mean to be a human being?
2) What is my relation to other human beings?
3) What is my relation to Being as such, the ongoing miracle that there is
Something rather than nothing?
  • Subjects: politics (government, campaigns, speech), Thoreau, Into the Wild
  • Good Reads questions
  • Calvinism (OS, predestination); Deism (blank slate, scientific, truth, collective); Romance (nature, individual, beauty)
Why did Thoreau go to the woods?
Sentence structures.
Thoreau/Into the Wild quotes/

What is America and who defines it?

How is individualism both beneficial and destructive to the American ideal?


1/17
letter to Krakauer=A
name paper=E

1/9
A=Discuss chapters
E=Free Read, Gov. state of the state

1/8
A=Into the Wild discussion, Quiz
E=What is an American? Two-page name paper due Thursday.

1/7
A=Into the Wild quote quiz
College findings from Frank Bruni article.

1/3
A=Continue Into the Wild through chapter 7
Discuss Realism vs, Romance
E=Discuss Exam
War on Children
1/2
A=Into the Wild
E=War on Children


12/21
Class memories. Discuss Into the Wild film.


12/20
E=Finish film with 6/6.

12/19
Recite poems and volunteer fro Poetry Out Loud competition.

12/18
Listen to Whitman's "Song of the Open Road" and relate to Into the Wild.

12/17
Substitute.
A=Read 47-61 and work with questions from packet.
E=Read Jack London's "To Build a Fire" and relate to Into the Wild.
Remember poems for Wednesday.
12/14
E=Eddie Vedder "No Ceiling"
Continue film with mise-en-shot questions and comments.
Collect one-page response to student generated question.
Poems recitation due Wednesday

A=Eddie Vedder "No Ceiling"
Discuss second reading (chapters 4, 5)
Poems recitation due Wednesday.

12/13
E=Continue film;
Homework: use one question from today or yesterday to answer a one-page
response, typed. Put name on back please.
A=Discuss chapters 1-3.
Homework: read next section of text and address questions from hand-out.

12/12
E=Continue film with Q/A
A=Do not meet.

12/11
E=Begin film of Into the Wild
A=Discuss chapter 1 and assign reading dates.

12/10
A=Introuduce Into the WIld, collect "Old Baldy" by Jack London.
E=Into the WIld exam, hand back journals

12/6
A=Read paragraphs from both London and Thoreau and compare
Naturalism/Trans.
E=Find quotes to support and refute the following:
Explain how McCandless’s quest for “ultimate freedom” is inherently selfish.
Finish novel.

12/5
Continue with Into the Wild=E
Jack London=A

12/4
Substitute
E=Continue reading Into the Wild

12/3
A period--Listen to Jack London's "To Start a Fire"
Jack London (1876-1916)
Check poems and free read books.
Homework: Finish reading "To Build a Fire" and print out other
London story, read and annotate.
E period--Discuss first 37 pages, students create own questions while reading.
Homework: pages 38-85.

11/30
Starter: Discuss the poem you selected.
Check Poetry Out Loud poem
Watch 13 minute Thoreau documentary.
E period has pages due Monday:
Reading Schedule
Into the Wild

Record the most important quote from each chapter.

Date Pages
12/3 1-37
12/4 38-85
12/5 86-132
12/6 133-155
12/7 156-end

Take down binaries (see above)

11/29
Begin Into the Wild with E period.

Starter: District foundations and competencies
SAT Practice Number 10
"Economy" lecture
Thoreau draws attention to beliefs
Natural Living
Most men trivial labors
What man thinks of self is fate
Seniors have little to offer
Food, shelter, clothing, fuel
Mocks old fashions
What do we really need

Grade Update


Select an American poem between 12 and 25 lines from the link below.
Print and bring to class on Friday.

http://poetryoutloud.org/poem/173941
11/27
Review "Economy"

11/26
Discuss "Economy" C
Read Economy D, E for Thursday.

11/19
"Insured by Smith and Wesson"
What lies do we tell ourselves to stay happy?
How is America influenced by its celebrity culture?
How do we begin to discover our true natures?

Collect "Economy" one and check questions/comments
Check upload of November Assessment Essay.

Homework:
1) Bergman Blog, answer one of the "Economy" questions
2) Annotate "Economy" Part II.


11/16
Notes: Why did Thoreau go to Walden Pond?
1) solitude, 2) experiment, 3) nature, purity, 4) set self as example, 5) poetry, art, 6) live life deliberately, 7)fresh start
Listen to Edder Vedder's "Small Talk"

Homework:
Please make 4 comments and 4 questions for each page of the Thoreau
"Economy" reading.

Also, upload Junior November Assessment paper on your Wiki space.


11/15
Assign "Economy" with 4/4 due Monday.
Remind to update GoodReads.
Starter--What would you celebrate for NBC School of the Week?

11/14
Thoreau/War on Kids

11/13
Edit Penn's light draft.

11/12
Read and discuss Tom Hazuks'a "Homeward Bound"

11/9
A="The Youth in Us." See E period for other activities.
E=First paragraph of Thoreau's "Where I Lived and What I Lived For" and anotate. Collect.
David Brooks article from today's New York Times "The Party of Work"
Update Goodreads account.

11/8
Read selections from journal work. What makes a good sentence.

11/7
A=Revise Penn.
E=The War on Kids

11/6
Continue with Thoreau. Hand back 8 questions/8 comments
A=Sentence flaws. Revise Penn paper
E=Revise Penn paper

10/25
Starter: What are the characteristics of good writing?
Thoreau notes:
Themes
Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work.
The Importance of Self-Reliance
The Value of Simplicity
The Illusion of Progress
Motifs
Motifs are recurring structures, contrasts, or literary devices that can help to develop and inform the text’s major themes.
The Seasonal Cycle
Poetry
Imaginary People
Symbols
Symbols are objects, characters, figures, or colors used to represent abstract ideas or concepts.
Walden Pond
Animals
Ice

Introduce toSeven Deadly Sins of Writing
Passive Voice, Punctuation comma, semi colon
Homework:
8 comments, 8 questions per page of Walden chapter.
Look over your writing papers and find corrections from seven deadly sins.
10/24
Continue with Walden. Eight questions and eight comments per page of "What I Lived and What I Lived For" due Friday.
Free read. Free write with quote and selected subjects. Read to classmate.

10/23
Starter-Students determine where they wish to live by placing tack on U.S. map. Explain why. Relate to "Where I Lived and What I Lived For"
Paraphrase fist paragraph of that essay. Discuss practical/philosophical
Continue reading Walden.

10/22
A=Introduce Thoreau, read text
E=Continue Thoreau

10/19
No A
E=Finish reading the first part of Walden/"Where I Lived and What I Lived For"

10/18
Starter-Show Thoreau's cabin. Could you exist in such a state?
Collect seven written pages.
Vocabulary practice 5 (1-10).
10/17
A=see E from yesterday
E=Begin Walden, Where I Live, and What I Live For.
Homework:
1) Sean Penn paragraph
2) America poem (Whitman)
3) Summer Free Choice Book Quote
4) American Experience Free Write
5) Subject of Interest Update
6) Free Read Book Choice
7) Boomtown, All Hallow's Eve paragraph

10/16
A=See notes from 10/11 on Emerson
Read text selection of "Self-Reliance"
E=Watch "All Hallow's Eve" and record 6 and 6
Homework: Answer one of your questions in eight sentences and upload to Wiki.

10/15
Divergent Thinking
http://www.schooltube.com/video/2cb4889891b0c637f8f8/RSA-Animate-Changing-Education-Paradigms

10/12
A=SSR
E=SSR, Trivia

10/11
E period only
Starter: Read Emerson aphorism on page 269. Select one and discuss.
Finish reading "Self-Reliance" selection.
Notes:
Transcendentalism:
  • The intuitive faculty, instead of the rational or sensical, became the means for a conscious union of the individual psyche (known in Sanskrit as Atman) with the world psyche also known as the Oversoul, life-force, prime mover and God (known in Sanskrit as Brahma).
Basic Premises:
1. An individual is the spiritual center of the universe - and in an individual can be found the clue to nature, history and, ultimately, the cosmos itself. It is not a rejection of the existence of God, but a preference to explain an individual and the world in terms of an individual.
2. The structure of the universe literally duplicates the structure of the individual self - all knowledge, therefore, begins with self-knowledge. This is similar to Aristotle's dictum "know thyself."
3. Transcendentalists accepted the neo-Platonic conception of nature as a living mystery, full of signs - nature is symbolic.
4. The belief that individual virtue and happiness depend upon self-realization - this depends upon the reconciliation of two universal psychological tendencies:
    • a. the expansive or self-transcending tendency - a desire to embrace the whole world - to know and become one with the world. b. the contracting or self-asserting tendency - the desire to withdraw, remain unique and separate - an egotistical existence.
    • This dualism assumes our two psychological needs; the contracting: being unique, different, special, having a racial identity,ego-centered, selfish, and so on; the expansive: being the same as others, altruistic, be one of the human race, and so on.
10/10
Computer lab to update Wiki (six pieces)
Join Good Reads

10/9
Notes on Puritans, Calvinism, Original Sin
Reason, Deism, Blank Slate, Absent Landlord
Romanticism, Noble Savage
Continue reading Self-Reliance

10/4
Introduce Emerson and "Self-Reliance"
Three questions for Courtney.

10/3
Free read and write session
Homework-Upload and update work on Wiki.

1) Sean Penn paragraph
2) America poem (Whitman)
3) Summer Free Choice Book Quote
4) American Experience Free Write
5) Subject of Interest Update
6) Free Read Book Choice

10/2
E period only:
Check work on wiki. Free read.

10/1
To computer lab to upload documents. Free write about a story idea.
Homework-
1) upload three pieces to WIKI if not done yet (poem, Sean Penn, free read
quote paper)

2) What is your subject of interest? What do you know? What do you need to
know? (100 words) Upload to WIKI as a file.

3) Upload today's edited free write story (300 words)

4) Listen to a few stories from this site. Think of someone you know who
might provide a similar story. Hand write journal entry for Wednesday
with story idea.
http://storycorps.org/listen/


9/29
Free Reading book selection
9/28
starter-(a period only): If you could speak with President Obama for ten minutes, which issues would you address and why?
A period-Whitman notes
Boomtown, Reelin' in the Years, 6 questions and comments
Homework-Upload poem, paragraph and free read quote paper to your wiki page.

9/27
starter-What is the most important word in Whitman's "I Hear America Singing"
Read student poems.
Discuss "I Hear America Singing"

9/26
Starter=Do you agree or disagree with Eric Hoffer quote: "The search for happiness is one of the chief sources of unhappiness."
Read Ruth Whippman's New York Times piece "America the Anxious."
A="Bartholomew's Song"
E=Listen to first two parts of Whitman's "Song of Myself"

Whitman poems and form
Homework=Revise poems, punctuate, left justify

9/25
A period=Read poems to class. Collect poems.
E=Watch "Bartholomew's Song" and discuss American values of individualism. Collect Free Reading quote paper.

9/24
E period.
Chapters 3 and 4 of SAT practice.
Read a few student poems
Free choice chats
Homework: Select a section of text under three lines from your free choice book. Explain why this text is so important to the understanding of the text. Typed, double-spaced, one-page.

9/21
Starter-Does the summer reading program encourage you to read? What are some alternatives?
Discuss CAPT results
Listen and read Whitman's "I Hear America Singing"
Read Wick Sloane's "I Hear America Singing" from 9/24 The Nation.
Free write 10 line poem. Read. Type for Monday (Tuesday for A period) and be ready to read to class.

9/20
starter-Boomtown show American values
Check rubric and research information
Summer reading on Friday


9/19
Boomtown, The Squeeze (5 questions, 5 comments)
For tonight:
1) Print out some material about your intended subject. This can come
from any source. Read and annotate (a few pages is fine).

2) Create a rubric which we could use for your project. Print and bring
to class.
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php


9/18
A=starter, tech proposals
Analyze paragraph (I feel, active voice, quotes, things, TS, CD, CM, CM)
Computer lab for Wiki sign-up

9/17
Starter: Pep rally
Select 1st quarter project of interest.
A period=SAT chapters 1 and 2
E period=Introduce TS, CD, CM, CM method

9/14
E period-
Collect revise paragraph
Trivia/American Studies

9/13
Starter: Discuss the characteristics of good writing.
Record five sentence patterns from OWL.
Watch African 9-11 film.
Homework+ Revise existing paragraph bringing percentage of number one sentence types below 50%.

9/12
Starter: Respond to the foloowing quote by MIT linguist Noam Chomsky:
“Most problems of teaching are not problems of growth but helping cultivate growth. As far as I know, and this is only from personal experience in teaching, I think about ninety percent of the problem in teaching, or maybe ninety-eight percent, is just to help the students get interested. Or what it usually amounts to is to not prevent them from being interested. Typically they come in interested, and the process of education is a way of driving that defect out of their minds. But if children['s] [...] normal interest is maintained or even aroused, they can do all kinds of things in ways we don’t understand.”
Watch Sean Penn 9-11 film and free write. Use free write to create structured paragraph (typed, times new roman, double space).

9/11
A period-Watch both British and Mexican film shorts from September 11. Free write and discuss.
Collect Fineman reading.
E period-Watch Mexican film short and discuss. Read Fineman from O to F using A, R, G, L, M, D, T.

9/10
E period=same starter as A, begin vocab work in book 3, page 22 and 34 (1-10).
A -see E period, Langston Hughes groups
homework: read from large O to large F in Fineman reading. Use A, R, G, L, M, D, T.

9/7
A period (see 9/6)
E period: starter: What does the school intend to accomplish by assigning summer reading?
Remind students of summer reading on 9/21
Read langston Hughes' poem "Let America be America Again"
Students read poem in groups of three.

9/6
Starter: What is AMerican literature and what should it address?
Discuss political compass findings. Look at both economic and social.
Listen to Bill Clinton DNC speech
Begin reading Howard Fineman's "Who is an American?"
Discuss SAT requirements
.


9/5
Starter: photo of three African-American and one Anglo males
Watch Cory Booker speech from DNC and identify word choice
Read David Brooks' The Elevator Speech and annotate
Homework: Take the Political Compass test and chart number
What is American literature?

9/4
Read David Brooks' article "Party of Strivers" and annotate

8/31
Starter: What does an American look like, act like, speak like and believe?
Photo to board
8/30
Starter: Is there anAmerican culture? Present students with list of beliefs:
Conservative Liberal
one culture multi cultural
creationism evolution
business environment
less govt more govt
state rights-federalism. national govt
religion, family values-tolerance, cultural relativism
imperialism, military--non-intervention

8/29
Starter: What are some of the more important American values and traits?
Read Mike Royko's piece "Greed Has No Race, Color or Creed" on page 927. Answer questions at end of section as a group. Discuss media, race and education.

8/28
Course introduction
KEY QUESTION:
What is American and who defines it?